Crested Pigeon (Ocyphaps lophotes)

The crested pigeon is a bird found widely throughout mainland Australia except for the far northern tropical areas. It is the only member of the genus Ocyphaps. There are only two Australian pigeon species that possess an erect crest, being the crested pigeon and the spinifex pigeon. The crested pigeon is the larger of the two species. The crested pigeon is sometimes incorrectly referred to as a topknot pigeon, however the topknot pigeon, or Lopholaimus antarcticus is a different species altogether, and has a red-brown crest that does not stand erect.

The length of the crested pigeon varies from 30 to 34 centimetres (12 to 13.6 inches). Colouration is grey with tinges of brown and green. It has a feathered but slender, black spike on top of the head. They run with the crest erect. The periorbital skin is bright orange. Wings have black stripes and are bronzed, while the primary feathers have colourful areas of brown, purple, blue and green. Immature birds have duller colours with no bronzing on the wings.





Pale capped Pigeon

Photo By : wildventures.com
Photo By : wildventures.com
The pale-capped pigeon (Columba punicea) also known as the purple wood pigeon is a species of large pigeon that is found patchily distributed in parts of the Indian Subcontinent and Southeast Asia.

It is mainly brown above and chestnut below with the a sheen of green or amethyst. Males have a whitish grey cap while females have a brownish grey cap and less gloss on the feathers. They are frugivores, foraging in small groups in the canopy of trees but sometimes descending to the ground for seeds and fallen fruit.Females have a more brownish-grey crown. Juveniles initially have the crown colour matching the mantle, duller wing-coverts and scapulars with rufous fringes, a much reduced gloss on the upper parts and greyer underparts. The legs are crimson and iris is creamy-yellow in adults. The skin around the eyes and the ceres are magenta





Photo By : Jainy Kuriakose

Sri-Lanka Wood Pigeon

Photo By : John A Thompson
Photo By : Athula Edirisinghe

Photo By : Steve Garvie

Pomeranian Pouter

Origin: This pouter variety originated in the Pomerania section of Germany. It is a direct descendant of the Dutch Cropper and was developed by the breeder who favored longer legged pouters with an upright carriage.

Overall Impression: The physical attributes of this breed such as the huge but proportioned globe, the massive body, the long, powerful limbs, the huge muffs, and the upright station of 60 to 80 degrees combine to give this breed the look of pure power. The length of the Pomeranian from the tip of the beak to the end of the tail should be 20 to 24 inches with a corresponding weight of 22 to 30 ounces.

Old Dutch Capuchine

The primary purpose of any standard is to guide the breeder in his quest to produce uniform specimens that most nearly resemble the ideal. This standard should also be used to guide those persons chosen to judge our birds. This will bring about consistent evaluation of our breed which is our goal.

We hope to impress in the minds of all breeders of the Old Dutch Capuchine that our breed has many characteristics or traits which must be taken into consideration when judging or choosing breeding stock. We must look for balance in our birds and not overly emphasize any one area, but rather focus on a balanced bird regardless of personal preference.